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Very shocking statistic.

Dispatches are showing a documentary tomorrow by Sierra Leonean journalist Sorious Samura about the increasing number of GANG RAPE, being committed by young black Men in London.

Samura notes in the Indy today:

In 1999 I witnessed a gang rape in Sierra Leone. I was forced to watch a group of rebel soldiers taking it in turns to rape a young girl in front of an audience of jeering men. It was the height of the civil conflict and rape had become a devastating weapon of war. When I moved to Britain I believed I had escaped such horrific sexual violence. As my Dispatches investigation tomorrow night shows, I was mistaken. Gang rape is happening here – and what I have found most disturbing as an African is that a disproportionate number of these attacks are being carried out by black or mixed-race young men.

Samura also cites the example of a young man who said:

One boy told me: “If she wants to go and meet a bag of boys then she’s probably a jezzie [slut], and if she’s going to a house it’s over – she’s going to get beaten [have sex].”

In other instances, as some of the victims in our film describe, girls can unwittingly walk into a trap, innocently visiting someone’s house to listen to music or watch a film only to discover that a group of boys are lying in wait.

Something as innocent as going to watch a film or listen to music, just kotching at a boys house crosses a thin line for some boys. This kind of behaviour of looking at a girl as a piece of prey, to try and trap her and force her to do something that she does not want, absolutely terrifies me.

Where has the lack of respect for black women’s bodies come from in London?

I have noticed recently in London the diminishing respect that young black men especially in poor boroughs have for girls. It can be something as little as intimidating behaviour at the bus stop, street harassment.

When did women and our bodies become the canvas onto which some insecure men assert their pseudo idea of masculinity?

For UK heads, Samura’s documentary is on Channel4 tomorrow night at 20H.

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